A Full-Service Law Firm for Nebraska Locals & Businesses Serving Western Nebraska Since 1977

Estate Planning Attorneys in Scottsbluff

Helping You Plan & Protect the Future

Estate planning is an often misunderstood legal service. Many believe that estate planning is only necessary for the elderly or ill, however, the opposite is true. All individuals and families should devise a thorough estate plan early, while they are of sound body and mind. Putting an estate plan in place can give you peace of mind that if something should happen unexpectedly, your specific needs and objectives will be known.

Call Douglas, Kelly, Ostdiek, Snyder, Ossian, Vogl & Snydertoday at (308) 365-1994 to discuss your estate planning needs.

Designing Unique Plans for Every Family

Our Scottsbluff estate planning lawyers are knowledgeable about all facets of estate planning, probate, and estate administration. We know that every family is different, which is why there is no One size fits all" plan. Whether you have concerns about leaving money for your children or grandchildren or want to account for business succession, we can help. We will devise a plan that is tailored to your individual needs.

Our legal services include:

  • Wills
  • Trusts
  • Probate
  • Living wills
  • Advance health care directives
  • Powers of attorney
  • Guardianships
  • Medicaid planning
  • Tax planning

What is the Difference Between a Will and a Trust?

There are many options when it comes to estate planning, such as a will or a trust. People hear these terms and assume they are for the same purpose: to name who will inherit my belongings after death. However, wills and trusts do more than just that. Read on below to learn about the differences between wills and trusts.

Wills

The creator of the will is referred to as the “testator”. The one who will carry out the last wishes in the will after the testator’s death is referred to as the “executor”.

A will can be used to:

  • Lessen the chance of family disputes.
  • Specify a personal representative for your estate.
  • Specify a trusted loved one to manage your property.
  • Name a guardian for your minor children and their property.
  • Decide how debts and taxes are to be paid.
  • Provide for pets.

With only a will, you cannot avoid the probate process.

Trusts

When a trust is involved, the creator of the trust (or settlor) must transfer assets to the trust and names themselves as “trustee”. The trustee can then appoint a “successor trustee” who will assume control of the estate after the settlor passes away or is incapacitated and can no longer make rational decisions. The living trust is a legal document that can be changed by the asset holder at any time. A trust can help you avoid probate, reduce estate taxes, and help you set up long-term property management.

If you decide to go with a trust, it is not necessary to go through the probate process. Your successor trustee can transfer assets in the trust based on the wishes you presented in the trust. Whereas with a will, the executor must file for probate when you pass away and they will be subject to the probate court’s supervision when making decisions about your estate.

Preserving Your Assets & Wishes

One of the main reasons to form an estate plan, regardless of how much your own, is to know that your wishes will be respected. Whether you have a complex estate that includes multiple properties, a business, and a number of asset distribution issues or a simple estate that will be left to your immediate family, we are here to guide you.

At Douglas, Kelly, Ostdiek, Snyder, Ossian, Vogl & Snyder, our Scottsbluff estate planning attorneys can answer all of your questions. Contact us now.

Contact Us Today!

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